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30 Iconic Aussie Animals for the Bucket List

Blog - 30 Iconic Aussie Animals for the Bucket List.

Here in Australia we have lot’s of different animals that are special to us… However we do eat our coat of arms, both the Kangaroo and the Emu. Here is the Australian Coat of Arms (Yum! – Just kidding)

Growing up in all through Primary school every year we would pick an “Aussie” animal and study all about it’s environment, where to find them and what makes them special. So below we have 30 Iconic Aussie Animals we think should be on your bucket list for animals “to see”.

Happy Reading!!!


 

Koala

Photo Credit: https://animalplanetsthemostextreme.fandom.com/wiki/Koala

Koala

The Koala is a cuddly, tree-dwelling Australian animal with grey fur, a big black nose, and large fluffy ears. It is a plant-eating marsupial mammal found only in Australia.

Drop Bears

The DropBear is from the same family as the Cuddly Koalas’ however evolution as allowed them to grow fangs and ditch the vegan diet to a more… carnivore diet. For this reason Dropbears live solo in popular forests down the East Coast where tourists attract.


 

Kangaroo

Kangaroos are a large hopping marsupial mammal found in Australia. They can hop at speeds of up to 70 km/h and the female carries its young in a pouch in its abdomen.

Kangaroo

Photo Credit: https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/plants-and-animals/red-kangaroo


 

Dingo

Photo Credit: https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/news/2014/03/dingo-culls-cause-more-harm-than-good/

Dingo

The dingo is a dog that is native to Australia. They’re naturally lean, weighing between 13kg and 18kg and standing about 60cm tall. Their coats are commonly golden yellow.


 

Wombat

Wombats are Australian marsupial mammals that have very short muscular legs and are the closest relative to the Koala. The main habitat for the Common Wombat is the temperate forest-covered areas of southeaster Australia. The species tends to avoid rainforests and is often found in the mountainous areas.

 

Wombat

Photo Credit: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/wombats-cube-poo-mystery-scientists-georgia-institute-technology-patricia-yang-a8639991.html


 

Photo Credit: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-11/conservationists-hunt-to-catch-the-elusive-tiger-quoll-on-camera/8258990

Quoll

Australia’s ‘native cats’ aren’t much like cats at all. Quolls are tree-climbing, den-dwelling marsupials. There are six species of quoll, four are found in Australia and two in New Guinea.


 

Tasmanian Devil

The Tasmanian devil is a carnivorous marsupial of the family Dasyuridae. It was once native to mainland Australia and is now found in the wild only on the island state of Tasmania. The Tasmanian devil got its name from early European settlers who upon hearing mysterious unearthly screams, coughs and growls from the bush decided to investigate further. Finding the dog-like animal with red ears, wide jaws and big sharp teeth led them to call it “The Devil”.

Photo Credit: https://www.themercury.com.au/news/tasmania/deadly-tasmanian-devil-cancer-evolving-to-optimal-virulence-says-new-utas-research/news-story/d608dec6753dec4ee5156f047af4abf6


 

Photo Credit: https://australianmuseum.net.au/learn/animals/frogs/green-tree-frog/ 

Green Tree Frog

Green Tree Frogs are one of the largest Australian frogs. They are a familiar frog to many Australians and is the most popular species of pet frog overseas. Green Tree Frogs live in urban areas, forests and woodlands, wetlands and heath. They have a habit of taking up residence in and around suburban houses, around shower blocks and water tanks.

 


 

Frill Necked Lizard

Frilled neck lizard is a species of lizard in the family Agamidae. The species is endemic to northern Australia and southern New Guinea. This species is the only member of the genus Chlamydosaurus. Frilled lizards inhabit dry woodland, usually with an open shrubby or grass understorey. Most of the time is spent off the ground in trees, often at a substantial height.

Photo Credit: https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/photography/reader-photos/2015/12/frill-necked-lizard/


 

Photo Credit: https://www.stuff.co.nz/world/australia/88170183/bluetongued-skink-drinks-from-water-bottle-during-42c-heatwave-in-perth-australia

Blue Tongue Lizard

The eastern blue tongue lizard is one of the most familiar reptiles in Australia. Large specimens may reach 60cm in total length. The legs are small and can often be overlooked, a situation which sometimes means the harmless bluetongue, with its large triangular head, is mistaken for a dangerous snake and inadvertently killed.


 

Platypus

The Platypus is a unique Australian species. Along with echidnas, Platypuses are grouped in a separate order of mammals known as monotremes, which are distinguished from all other mammals because they lay eggs. When first discovered, the unusual look of a Platypus caused considerable confusion and doubt amongst European naturalists and scientists, many of whom believed that the animal was a fake.

Jonathan Munro captured this shot in the Atherton Tablelands area of Cairns!

Photo Credit: http://wildmelbourne.org/articles/2013/11/5/platypus-magic


 

Photo Credit: https://www.outback-australia-travel-secrets.com/saltwater-crocodiles.html

Saltwater Crocodile “Salties”

Australian Saltwater crocodiles are by far the most dangerous animals in Australia. Australian saltwater crocodiles are the largest reptile in the world in terms of mass (can be over 1000kg), and the largest crocodile with a confirmed measurement and regarded as dangerous by people who share the same environment. It was hunted for its skin throughout its range up to the 1970s and is threatened by illegal killing and habitat loss.


 

Freshwater Crocodiles “Freshies”

Freshwater Crocodile is a species of crocodile endemic to the northern regions of Australia.  Unlike their much larger Australian relative, the saltwater crocodile, freshwater crocodiles are not known as man-eaters, although they will bite in self-defence and brief non-fatal attacks, apparently the result of mistaken identity, have occurred. The Freshwater Crocodile is slender-snouted and considerably smaller in build and overall size compared to its cousin, the Saltwater Crocodile. Its colour ranges from grey to tan-brown, with dark patches along the sides and top of the body. The nostrils and eyes sit at the top of the head and the fine sharp teeth are clearly visible even when the mouth is closed. The powerful tail features large triangular scales known as ‘scutes’ along its length, which is almost half the total length of the animal.

Photo Credit: https://www.backyardbuddies.org.au/fact-sheets/fresh-water-crocodile


 

Photo Credit: https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/blogs/wild-journey/2016/01/australias-deadly-and-mysterious-taipan/

Taipan

Taipan is large, fast-moving, highly venomous, and endemic to Australasia. There are currently three recognised species, one of which, the coastal taipan, has two subspecies. The taipans are considered some of the deadliest known snakes. The Taipan lives in grasslands, coastal heaths, grassy beach dunes and cultivated areas such as cane fields in the far north of Australia and down the Queensland coast, but has also been found in Northern New South Wales.


 

Tree Kangaroo

Tree kangaroos are found only in the rain forests of Australia, West Papua, and Papua New Guinea. Six of ten species are found in Papua New Guinea, in some of the last undisturbed rain forest habitat in the world. Tree Kangaroo has all of the specialised adaptations needed for an arboreal life. Shorter hind limbs, strong, stocky arms, and a long tail for balance while leaping among the branches. Their feet are broader than those of ground kangaroos and have padded soles to aid with gripping and sharp curved claws for climbing. The hands have individual fingers that move independently which provide greater dexterity and grip.

Photo Credit: https://kids.sandiegozoo.org/animals/tree-kangaroo


 

Blog - 30 Iconic Aussie Animals for the Bucket List.

Photo Credit: https://www.qut.edu.au/science-engineering/about/news?id=125796

Wallaby

A wallaby is a small- or mid-sized macropod native to Australia and New Guinea. The most striking difference between kangaroo and wallaby is their size. While a kangaroo can reach a towering two meters, their more petite relatives range from between 30 cm to just one meter. Wallabies are herbivores and they mostly eat grass. They can also eat leaves and fruits, and other plants like ferns and herbs. When grazing, wallabies will often congregate in small groups, though most species are typically solitary. Wallabies are more active in the evening and early morning, especially those in arid areas.


 

Quokka

Abundant on Rottnest Island, these smiling marsupials are also found in small, scattered areas in the South-West of Western Australia. Quokkas are curious creatures that will often approach humans, which has led to the quokka selfie trend. Mainland populations tend to be clustered around dense streamside vegetation but can also be found in shrubland and heath areas, particularly around swamps. Quokkas prefer a warm climate but are adapted to the seasonal variations on Rottnest Island. Here Quokkas occupy a wide range of semi-arid areas.

Photo Credit: http://www.traveller.com.au/worlds-happiest-animal-the-quokka-becomes-the-most-popular-tourist-attraction-at-australias-rottnest-island-gunpvd


 

Photo Credit: https://cassowaryrecoveryteam.org/the-southern-cassowary/description/

Cassowary

Cassowaries are ratites (flightless birds without a keel on their sternum bone) that are native to the tropical forests of New Guinea (Papua New Guinea and Indonesia), East Nusa Tenggara, the Maluku Islands, and north-eastern Australia. The Cassowary’s large size, its large greyish helmet (casque) and the red wattle hanging from the neck, make it easy to identify. The feathers of the body are black and hair-like. The bare skin of the head and fore-neck is blue, while the rear of the neck is red. Both sexes are similar in appearance, but the female is generally larger than the male, with a taller casque, and is brighter in colour. Young Cassowaries are browner than adults and have duller coloured head and neck. The chicks are striped yellow and black. If a Cassowary is approached it will generally stand its ground. If the intruder approaches too close, the bird will stretch itself as tall as possible, ruffle its feathers and let at a loud hiss to scare the intruder off. The birds are equipped with quite dangerous claws, and will readily attack a persistent intruder, although they usually retreat into the dense rainforest.


 

Goanna

Goanna is the name given to any of the various Australian monitor lizards of the genus Varanus, as well as to certain species from Southeast Asia. There are around 20 species of goanna, 15 of which are endemic to Australia. They are a varied group of carnivorous reptiles that range greatly in size and fill several ecological niches. The Goanna features prominently in Aboriginal mythology and Australian folklore. Traditionally, it formed an important part the diet of many Aboriginal peoples.

Photo Credit: https://www.bushheritage.org.au/species/goannas


 

Photo Credit: https://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/topics/animals-and-plants/native-animals/native-animal-facts/echidnas

Echindna

Echidnas, together with the platypus, are the world’s only monotremes, or egg-laying mammals.  There are two species of echidnas:  the long-beaked echidna, which is confined to the highlands of New Guinea; and the short-beaked echidna is common throughout most of temperate Australia and lowland New Guinea. Echidnas are medium-sized, solitary mammals covered with coarse hair and spines. Superficially, they resemble the anteaters of South America and other spiny mammals such as hedgehogs and porcupines. They are usually black or brown in colour. There have been several reports of albino echidnas, their eyes pink and their spines white.


 

Sugar Gliders

The sugar glider is a small arboreal marsupial. It has a head-body length of 16 – 21 cm and a 16 – 21 cm tail. Adults weigh 100 – 160 grams, with males slightly heavier than females. The body is covered with grey to brown fur with a prominent dark dorsal stripe that extends to the forehead. Its tail is long, well-furred and prehensile. It has stretchy membranes that extend on both sides of the body between the front and back limbs.

 Photo Credit: https://mashable.com/2016/01/10/sugar-glider-instagram/#g86vFPodESqu

 

Blog - 30 Iconic Aussie Animals for the Bucket List.

Photo Credit: https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/topics/wildlife/2018/01/the-bilby-is-making-a-comeback-in-outback-nsw/

Bilby

The Bilby is an important part of traditional indigenous culture in the deserts of Central Australia. The large rabbit like ears of the Greater Bilby (referred to as Bilby) have also made it a popular Australian icon at Easter. Sadly, through habitat loss and competition with introduced animals, the number of these small mammals has dramatically reduced over the last 100 years.  As members of a group of ground-dwelling marsupials known as Bandicoots, Bilbies have long pointed snouts and compact bodies. Bilbies measure between 29 and 55cm in length and differ from other Bandicoots by their larger ears, long silky fur and longer tails.  Bilbies are remarkable burrowers, using their strong forelimbs and claws to build extensive tunnels. One Bilby may make up to twelve burrows within its home range to use for shelter. They have long slender tongues that they use to eat a specialised diet of seeds, insects, bulbs, fruit and fungi. Bilbies are active at night, sheltering in their burrows during the daytime.


 

Pademelon

Akin to wallabies and kangaroos, the pademelon is a small marsupial found in thickly vegetated areas of Queensland and New South Wales, while an abundant population exists in Tasmania. Once hunted by Aboriginals and settlers for their meat and soft fur, today the pademelon is threatened by predators and land clearing.

Blog - 30 Iconic Aussie Animals for the Bucket List.

Photo Credit: https://www.pinterest.com.au/pin/435512226450334242/


 

Blog - 30 Iconic Aussie Animals for the Bucket List.

Photo Credit: https://australianmuseum.net.au/learn/animals/birds/laughing-kookaburra/

Kookaburra

‘Kookaburra sits on the old gum tree, merry merry king of the bush is he’ are lyrics to a nursery rhyme familiar to all Australians, and from a young age, locals are taught to recognise their calls which echo human laughter. The largest of the kingfishers are carnivorous birds who live in suburban, bush and forest environments across Australia and New Guinea.


 

Numbat

Numbats are a small to medium-sized marsupial with an unmistakable appearance; distinguished from any other species by the unique combination of a ‘bottlebrush’ tail, bold white strips on the hindquarters, a black line running across the eyes and a long snout. Adults weight 500–700 g and measure approximately 270 mm (head–body) with a 200 mm tail.

Blog - 30 Iconic Aussie Animals for the Bucket List.

Photo Credit: https://www.ecolsoc.org.au/news/2018/01/phd-project-numbat-conservation-and-ecology


 

Blog - 30 Iconic Aussie Animals for the Bucket List.

Photo Credit: http://www.australianwildlife.org/wildlife/western-barred-bandicoot.aspx

Bandicoot

Western Barred Bandicoots are the smallest species of bandicoot, weighing approximately 220 g. They have a pointy snout, big ears and a short tail that is sometimes lost in a fight with other members of their species. Bandicoot’s fur is light brown with little bit of blackish grey on top. Bandicoot likes to roam around alone and mainly throughout the night. Western Barred Bandicoots can live for at least four years in the wild.


 

Dugong

The Dugong is a 3 meters long large sea animal that mainly enjoys a life along the coast. Dugongs eyes and ears are very small because it doesn’t really need them. The Dugong has a broad flat muzzle and mouth so it can easily graze the bottom of the sea. Its diet includes plants such as seaweed, roots and leaves. The Dugong’s life is approx 2.5 years to 8 years.

Blog - 30 Iconic Aussie Animals for the Bucket List.

Photo Credit: https://australianmuseum.net.au/learn/animals/mammals/dugong/


 

Blog - 30 Iconic Aussie Animals for the Bucket List.

Photo Credit: https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/topics/wildlife/2017/11/the-tawny-frogmouth/

Tawny Frogmouth

The Tawny Frogmouth is known for its deathly stare, one of their defence mechanisms. It has light and dark grey feathers that blends with some trees like a camouflage. They can lower their own temperature to save energy and survive in a very harsh continent. They live in Australia and are common throughout the northern and eastern parts of the state.


 

Grey-headed Flying Fox

Grey-headed flying fox is one of the largest bats in Australia. Their wingspan is over 1 meter long. Its wings are black, and the head is grey. It has an orange-red mantle encircling the neck. The flying fox lives in South-East of Australia and are more popular around the coast. Its diet consists of different fruit.

Blog - 30 Iconic Aussie Animals for the Bucket List.

Photo Credit: https://australianmuseum.net.au/learn/animals/bats/grey-headed-flying-fox/


 

Blog - 30 Iconic Aussie Animals for the Bucket List.

Photo Credit: http://canberrabirds.org.au/our-birds/canberra-garden-birds/cockatoos-and-parrots/australian-king-parrot/

Australian-King Parrot

The Australian King-Parrot is a beautifully coloured parrot who lives on the cost in South-East Australia. An adult parrot is about 43 cm long. If these parrots are hand-raised by humans, they can be calm and quiet household pets. They have limited talking ability and usually don’t like to be handled. It is unsure how long they live but some people have seen them to live for up to 25 years.


 

Gang Gang Cockatoo

The Gang-Gang Cockatoo is a bird that lives in the cooler and wetter forests and woodlands of Australia. It has a red head and little bit of yellow underneath its nose. The rest of the Gang-Gang Cockatoo’s body consists of black feathers with white edges. It has a distinctive call, which is described as resembling a creaky gate, or the sound of a cork being pulled from a wine bottle. The name “Gang-Gang” comes from the Australian Aboriginal language. In that language the layout of the two words in a row is common and they don’t pronounce the first letter.

Blog - 30 Iconic Aussie Animals for the Bucket List.

Photo Credit: http://canberrabirds.org.au/birds/gang-gang-cockatoo/


 

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